Saturday, April 16, 2005

It's like that thing Elmo said, but without the "far" and with a different word for "near"

There was a guy in college we called Elmo. He was very tall and looked just like him. Poor Todd. Todd was a good guy though. Nothing bad to say about Todd, unless you count that Elmo thing...

So not too long ago Jenn posted Go rent 'Closer' and said lots of nice things about the movie. I was happy to read these things, because when the movie was first being advertised, I thought it looked potentially very good and was thinking there would be lots of things said just like Jenn's comments. However, I didn't hear a lot of good things said. A friend of mine, who I think saw it with his girlfriend (perhaps not the best test audience), didn't sound too thrilled with it.

So on Jenn's recommendation, I finally saw it, and you know what? I did like it. I even did something pretty geeky. I wrote down some quotes from it. I was going to find some way to post them, but then I realized that if you have red hair AND live in Chicago, you will insist that it's pointless to empathize with movies. However, I would insist that circles are pointless and yet we haven't gotten rid of them. On the other hand, if you're someone else, then you probably just find the whole practice of quoting a movie sort of creepy and "twelvish." I agree. So I won't. But I have them written down here, and just like the "But" that started this sentence, I think they are conversation starters that people will notice, so perhaps I'll leave them displayed on my coffee table to promote healthy discussion of human behavior.

(is a "coffee table log" a "clog"?)

So there.

8 comments:

Jenn Onofrio said...

It's kind of sick how honest that movie is, isn't it? Now, granted, Marber's taken all of the emotional intensity of any relationship configuration possible and condensed it into four people's lives (at least, that's how I'm able to keep my faith in men -- I like to think there's hope in way of the prospect of a healthy relationship), but I only say again: it's just so refreshingly honest.

Marber said it was a love story, and he thinks Alice [Natalie Portman] is the ultimate winner, in the end. What do you think?

Theo said...

Now, with regard to Alice being the winner, the passport tradeoff as she returned to the U.S. made me think she was lying throughout the whole movie, which really changes how you can look at every scene with her in it (especially when she spouts out her philosophies about not lying in relationships). So I think Alice was the winner... only because she was the MOST manipulative.

Well, with regard to your faith in men, I don't think the movie was too extreme regarding men. I think in those TYPE of situations, lots of men act that way. The trick is to find a man+woman combination that prevents those types of situations, I think... I think.

~ange said...

Well, I haven't seen the movie yet, but I wanted to add (defend?)that empathizing (that word looks wrong) with movies (or any art form) is not bad. I only have a problem when people use description by emulating a particular character- such as, "I am exactly like x and he is exactly like y and she is exactly like z." Period. End of description. As if renaming an entity after a character explains all that can be said.
And circles kick ass. Think Stonehenge or orbit or gravity strings. Now see- I'm doing it. I described circles by emphasizing these separate entities as if these three things describe all that can be said about circles and clear all confusion for someone that doesn't believe cirlces kick ass. On that note, I have decided to write a Circle Haiku:

Alice Entered Hole
In Circle Shape But Sharpened
Edge Didn't Cut Her

~ange said...

And since your coffee table isn't in Chicago, I have also decided to go see this buzzing movie and attempt to figure out what words were worth quoting. Or is that too "fourteenish"? :)

Theo said...

Are you saying Alice works (or lives?) in a sewer?

With regard to seeing the movie, I'm sure it's over-hyped at this point. Don't make it a POINT to see it. Just ... let yourself see it naturally. Ya' know?

Jenn Onofrio said...

Ummm, I disagree. Angie, see it. You'll love it. End of story. Go rent it tonite.

~ange said...

Well, I'll see it next time I wander into Blockbuster. Ted: I think "clog" is already a term in use. Well, at least some use. I propose the term "eelog" following in the tradition of blog. No wait, that doesn't work either. OK, how about changing coffee table to mug slab "gblog" or beverage sideboard "eslog" or ...I'll go now...

~ange said...

Correction: it would be "edlog" and this also, seems somehow wrong. You could say: et beverage sideboard. But that's silly.
Seriously, I have to go to SpinCycle.